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Locavore Challenge #22: Read a Locavore Book

I’m one of those people who likes to learn. So when I commit to an idea, I tend to read about it and buy a lot of books. Amazon Prime is my downfall. Take for example when I tried a month long vegan experiment earlier this year (sorry, not blog recorded). I managed to build a 4 book vegan cookbook library practically overnight. So when I became more interested in the locavore movement, I started reading.

This is by in no means a complete Locavore Library list but a collection of books (and cookbooks) I’ve read and really enjoyed. If you have others you think I should add to my ongoing reading list, please share!

Animal Vegetable Mineral (Barbara Kingsolver)

This book might have had the most influence on me launching my blog. Barbara Kingsolver and her family document their year of living off their land. Of course, they lived on a small farm so had a bit of an advantage. I might not have a farm, but I have a lot of local resources!

In Defense of Food (Michael Pollen)

Really, all of Michael Pollan’s books are pretty fantastic, but they tend to be a bit repetitive if you’ve read his other stuff. In Defense of Food is kind of the quick and dirty tale of where food comes from. For a more in depth history of food and its origins, pick up Omnivore’s Dilemma.

The New Brooklyn Cookbook (Melissa Vaughan, Brendan Vaughan and Michael Harlan Turkell)

This book features recipes from 31 of local Brooklyn restaurants. I love eating at a place then reading the recipe to understand how it’s made. Plus, the inside front cover has a map and listing of all the restaurants, so when I want to go out, I have an easy restaurant guide right there.

Fast Food Nation (Eric Schlosser)

Yes, I know, not exactly highlighting local cuisine, but read it and learn about the fast food world, slaughter houses and processed food. I’m not trying to preach, but just knowing where your food comes from might make you think more about what food you’re eating.

Edible Brooklyn Cookbook (Rachel Wharton)

First, their pictures are BEAUTIFUL! The book has recipes from local artisans, chefs, and ordinary folk who celebrate Brooklyn’s finest ingredients. Recipes from places like Sixpoint brewery, Stone Park Cafe and blogs like NotEatingOutInNY.com.

Eating Local: The Cookbook Inspired by America’s Farmers (Sur La Table and Janet Fletcher)

My favorite thing about this book is how it’s organized. Alphabetical, first by veggies, then by fruits, plus some farm stories in between. So when I get way too much corn from my CSA, I can flip to C and know exactly what to do with it.

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